Our Research

Kid CAP Blocks


Research Interests

In the C.A.P. Lab at UConn Waterbury, we study multiple aspects of cognitive development, including learning, memory, and thinking (i.e., executive functions). Our most current work is longitudinal in nature and examines the relations between action observation, action execution, and imitation across infancy. We are focusing on the observation of behaviors, as well as developmental psychophysiology, including the measurement of brain electrical activity (EEG) and heart activity (ECG).

Research Projects 

Husky See, Husky Do: Babies Dr. Cuevas with infant

  • Ages: 6 weeks to 24 months
  • Have you ever wondered: “What is my baby learning when watching others?” We are conducting a study using different imitation games to understand how babies’ brains respond when observing and copying others’ actions. Each visit is about 45 minutes long and your baby will typically receive a bib or t-shirt with our lab logo for participating. Please contact us if you would like to sign up or find out more!
  • Funding: NIH R03 HD081333 (K. Cuevas PI) EEG Mu Rhythm Analysis of Infant Social Information Processing; UConn Large Faculty Grant (K. Cuevas PI) A Systematic Analysis of the Infant EEG Mu Rhythm; Social Sciences, Humanities, & Arts Research Experience (SHARE) Award (S. Limaye; K. Cuevas Mentor)
  • This study was approved by the UConn IRB, Protocol #H12-289.

Husky See, Husky Do: Kids

  • Ages: 2 to 6 years
  • Looking for a fun and exciting experience for you and your children? We have recently extended our Husky See, Husky Do Study to include young children. This study involves different imitation and picture games that will help us understand how children’s brains respond when watching and copying others’ actions. Each visit is between 60-75 minutes long and your child will typically receive a t-shirt with our lab logo for participating. Please contact us if you would like to sign up or find out more!
  • Funding:Social Sciences, Humanities, & Arts Research Experience (SHARE) Award (S. Limaye; K. Cuevas Mentor); Sam L. Witryol Scholarship (L. Bryant; K. Cuevas Mentor); UConn Office of Undergraduate Research Supply Award (Y. Lopez & K. Valerio; K. Cuevas Mentor); UConn Psychology Department Undergraduate Research Grant (Y. Lopez & K. Valerio; K. Cuevas Mentor); UConn Summer Undergraduate Research Fund (SURF) Award (K. Valerio; K. Cuevas Mentor)
  • This study was approved by the UConn IRB, Protocol #H14-030.

Autism Spectrum Disorder: Audiovisual Speech

  • Ages: 6 to 10 years
  • In collaboration with Southern Connecticut State University (SCSU) and Haskins Laboratories, our work uses electroencephalography (EEG) paired with eye-tracking technology to examine perception and imitation of speaking faces in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The goal of this project is to provide a more sophisticated understanding of the factors that underlie perception and imitation of audiovisual speech in children with ASD. Participation is open to typically developing children, children with ASD, and children with expressive language impairment, and would involve visiting SCSU and Haskins Laboratories. For further study information, please email listeningtofaces@haskins.yale.edu, and/or call (203) 392-5172 or 865-6163, x337 or x245.
  • Funding: NIH R21 DC011342 (J. Irwin PI) & NIH R15 DC013864 (J. Irwin PI; K. Cuevas Co-I) Neurobiological Signatures of Perception and Imitation of Audiovisual Speech in Children with ASD
  • This study was approved by the Yale School of Medicine, IRB#26173, and SCSU, IRB# 14-028.

cute baby